Striper Talk Striped Bass Fishing, Surfcasting, Boating

     

Left Nav S-B Home Register FAQ Members List S-B on Facebook Arcade WEAX Tides Buoys Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Right Nav

Left Container Right Container
 

Go Back   Striper Talk Striped Bass Fishing, Surfcasting, Boating » Striper Chat - Discuss stuff other than fishing ~ The Scuppers and Political talk » DIY - Forum

DIY - Forum Do It Yourself for Non-Fishing Items

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 06-07-2018, 06:41 PM   #31
Slipknot
Super Moderator
iTrader: (0)
 
Slipknot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Middleboro MA
Posts: 16,509
poplar and pine can warp way worse than plywood might.
Some clients can afford a no particle board option so veneer core plywood is good. I use it on almost everything as I build a lot of cases.
That's OK Gilly, they already know I'm weird.
Just use an Iron and chase it with a block of wood, you'll be fine.

The United States Constitution does not exist to grant you rights; those rights are inherent within you. Rather it exists to frame a limited government so that those natural rights can be exercised freely.
Slipknot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2018, 06:49 PM   #32
bloocrab
Callinectes sapidus
iTrader: (0)
 
bloocrab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 5,948

...
bloocrab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2018, 05:44 AM   #33
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Edgebanding video......I dont use the special edge trimmer tool he uses in the video ....I use the edge teeth of a flat file.
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5a40hj
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 06:10 AM   #34
piemma
Very Grumpy bay man
iTrader: (0)
 
piemma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 8,688
Blog Entries: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
Good staging makes it much easier. Had to install crown moulding in every room of this 5,000 sq. ft. house......not done on step ladders.
I did 5" crown molding in 2 rooms with cathedral ceilings. Never again. Cutting the joints took lots of trial and error and PATIENCE.

No boat, back in the suds.
piemma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 06:12 AM   #35
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by piemma View Post
I did 5" crown molding in 2 rooms with cathedral ceilings. Never again. Cutting the joints took lots of trial and error and PATIENCE.
Putty and paint....makes it what it ain’t. 😂
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 06:49 AM   #36
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
....makes a carpenter what he ain’t. 😂


Big difference in paint grade jobs versus stained or prefinished.
For the latter you need more skill and patience....using putty in poorly fitting joints looks like crap.
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 07:11 AM   #37
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
....makes a carpenter what he ain’t. 😂


Big difference in paint grade jobs versus stained or prefinished.
For the latter you need more skill and patience....using putty in poorly fitting joints looks like crap.
I have a ton more welding experience over carpentry experience, so my old saying was always- a grinder and paint makes you the welder you aint! but yes i can see how a stained job would make a big difference.

We just did crown molding around our gallery and i was quite humbled by it. i tried a few different approaches and for me, I found that the best method was to use my makita grinder that i usually use on metal paired with a 40 grit sand paper disc was the best tool for corners... but one end and then cope the other side with the grinder.

I grind and polish glass occasionally... that is a zen art that i could write a book about....
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 07:59 AM   #38
nightfighter
Seldom Seen
iTrader: (0)
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 8,509
A couple thoughts on crown molding, which I have done a lot of;

Check ceiling lines first for level. If level, easy peasy. But if you put your eyes up at ceiling level you will find sighting 4 out of 5 will make you seasick... If delta is less than .5 inch, caulk between top of crown and ceiling.

Be sure you have a tall enough fence on your miter saw and mark or tape the base for the spring angle so your joints will be consistent.

Make up 4 set up pieces and mark them inside left, inside right, outside left, outside right. These will help you to minimize mistakes when setting up your cuts, especially on inside pieces that are to be coped. I still do this every time.

Makes a pencil line on the profile after cutting. It will make coping much easier as you can see the line better. Take your time with coping saw. It is not a race. And it does not matter how nice the backside of the cope looks. I usually have a tablesaw handy to knock down anything I think might help the final fit.

“Americans have the right and advantage of being armed, unlike the people of other countries, whose leaders are afraid to trust them with arms.” – James Madison.
nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 08:05 AM   #39
nightfighter
Seldom Seen
iTrader: (0)
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 8,509
Nebe, I will butt end both ends of wall opposite entry to room as first piece to install. Then cope left and right, looking for where outside miter joint or long wall requires mid joint to prevent doing a double ended coped piece

“Americans have the right and advantage of being armed, unlike the people of other countries, whose leaders are afraid to trust them with arms.” – James Madison.
nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 09:47 AM   #40
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightfighter View Post
A couple thoughts on crown molding, which I have done a lot of;

Check ceiling lines first for level. If level, easy peasy. But if you put your eyes up at ceiling level you will find sighting 4 out of 5 will make you seasick... If delta is less than .5 inch, caulk between top of crown and ceiling.

Be sure you have a tall enough fence on your miter saw and mark or tape the base for the spring angle so your joints will be consistent.

Make up 4 set up pieces and mark them inside left, inside right, outside left, outside right. These will help you to minimize mistakes when setting up your cuts, especially on inside pieces that are to be coped. I still do this every time.

Makes a pencil line on the profile after cutting. It will make coping much easier as you can see the line better. Take your time with coping saw. It is not a race. And it does not matter how nice the backside of the cope looks. I usually have a tablesaw handy to knock down anything I think might help the final fit.
Great tips ! I wish I talked to you last week.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 03:15 PM   #41
piemma
Very Grumpy bay man
iTrader: (0)
 
piemma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 8,688
Blog Entries: 2
Great tips Ross.

No boat, back in the suds.
piemma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2018, 09:40 PM   #42
Sea Dangles
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Sea Dangles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,354
How about putting blocks in the corners and make straight cuts!
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Sea Dangles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2018, 05:27 AM   #43
Guppy
User
iTrader: (0)
 
Guppy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sea Dangles View Post
How about putting blocks in the corners and make straight cuts!
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Stick to fishing
Guppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2018, 02:58 PM   #44
Pete F.
Master tråd morder
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: vt
Posts: 3,598
It’s easy nowadays compared to a hand miter box, lion trimmer and hammer
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Pete F. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2018, 03:03 PM   #45
nightfighter
Seldom Seen
iTrader: (0)
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 8,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete F. View Post
It’s easy nowadays compared to a hand miter box, lion trimmer and hammer
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
I still have a lion trimmer.....

“Americans have the right and advantage of being armed, unlike the people of other countries, whose leaders are afraid to trust them with arms.” – James Madison.
nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2018, 05:31 AM   #46
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Or a spiral ratchet screwdriver......still use it in the shop once in a while....for nostalgia.

In the 90's I was working as a foreman installing architectural millwork, in banks, libraries, country clubs, airports etc. Most of my crew were usually unskilled guys who could not cope prefinished 5" cherry crown moulding to save their lives. When we landed a job finishing out a five story hotel with crown moulding throughout, I suggested that we buy a machine called a Copemaster.
It will cope any moulding profile in a few seconds. With it we "precoped" left and right ends of crown moulding stock in the shop, making it easier for the installers on the job.


https://youtu.be/LWqF5r6RhyM

Last edited by Rmarsh; 06-11-2018 at 05:41 AM..
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2018, 07:44 AM   #47
Pete F.
Master tråd morder
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: vt
Posts: 3,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
Or a spiral ratchet screwdriver......still use it in the shop once in a while....for nostalgia.

In the 90's I was working as a foreman installing architectural millwork, in banks, libraries, country clubs, airports etc. Most of my crew were usually unskilled guys who could not cope prefinished 5" cherry crown moulding to save their lives. When we landed a job finishing out a five story hotel with crown moulding throughout, I suggested that we buy a machine called a Copemaster.
It will cope any moulding profile in a few seconds. With it we "precoped" left and right ends of crown moulding stock in the shop, making it easier for the installers on the job.


https://youtu.be/LWqF5r6RhyM
That is an interesting machine, some setup time but it should make money.

Pete
In life, it's important to know when to stop arguing with people and simply let them be wrong.
Pete F. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2018, 08:54 AM   #48
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete F. View Post
That is an interesting machine, some setup time but it should make money.
Yes....if I remember correctly it cost around $500, my company saved more than that on that one job alone. These days I'm back doing residential...still do a lot of crown moulding...but no need for copemaster.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2018, 09:09 AM   #49
Pete F.
Master tråd morder
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: vt
Posts: 3,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
Yes....if I remember correctly it cost around $500, my company saved more than that on that one job alone. These days I'm back doing residential...still do a lot of crown moulding...but no need for copemaster.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Now it's $2495 but skill levels have not gone up

Pete
In life, it's important to know when to stop arguing with people and simply let them be wrong.
Pete F. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2018, 06:16 AM   #50
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete F. View Post
Now it's $2495 but skill levels have not gone up

When I started in the home building trade, the entire house was built without any nail guns....framing, siding, roofing, trim....all nailed by hand. Todays carpenters use a nail gun like it's an automatic weapon....way too many nails and in all the wrong places.
Also I've noticed that almost none of them have a block plane,sharpening stone, or handsaw
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2018, 07:10 AM   #51
Pete F.
Master tråd morder
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: vt
Posts: 3,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
When I started in the home building trade, the entire house was built without any nail guns....framing, siding, roofing, trim....all nailed by hand. Todays carpenters use a nail gun like it's an automatic weapon....way too many nails and in all the wrong places.
Also I've noticed that almost none of them have a block plane,sharpening stone, or handsaw
And sawzalls were for Plumbers
I had a box with 4 handsaws
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device

Pete
In life, it's important to know when to stop arguing with people and simply let them be wrong.
Pete F. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2018, 07:13 AM   #52
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
Things ain’t like they yusta wuz.....

Laid flown my floor trim yesterday. I guess that is when you discover how uneven your subfloor is... 😆
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2018, 04:38 PM   #53
Guppy
User
iTrader: (0)
 
Guppy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
When I started in the home building trade, the entire house was built without any nail guns....framing, siding, roofing, trim....all nailed by hand. Todays carpenters use a nail gun like it's an automatic weapon....way too many nails and in all the wrong places.
Also I've noticed that almost none of them have a block plane,sharpening stone, or handsaw
Me too.... my shoulder still hurts from nailing off the ceiling strapping...
Guppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 05:09 AM   #54
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guppy View Post
Me too.... my shoulder still hurts from nailing off the ceiling strapping...



Yeah Gup...that underhanded nailing was a tough job for me as a scrawney 18 yr. old....but I did learn to hammer left handed once my right arm went numb......and driving 16d nails in all day long... with a 22 oz hammer...after the first six months my blisters turned to calluses.
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 05:35 AM   #55
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Finished up on two more....The furniture style legs on the island can go either way vertically...customers choice.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Resized_20180613_084613_6330.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	91.9 KB
ID:	65326   Click image for larger version

Name:	Resized_20180613_145250_6466.jpg
Views:	50
Size:	95.1 KB
ID:	65327  
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 05:37 AM   #56
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
So clean. Does the home owner hire you or are you hired by a designer to execute their concept?
I make pendant lighting for kitchens if you ever have a client that wants something very unique.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 05:51 AM   #57
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebe View Post
So clean. Does the home owner hire you or are you hired by a designer to execute their concept?
I make pendant lighting for kitchens if you ever have a client that wants something very unique.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device

I work directly for the developer/ home builder....they refer customers to kitchen design/cabinet provider...then I install with very limited contact with customer....which is just how I like it to be honest...for me.... after 45 years of doing this.... customers are usually a PIA.
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 11:22 AM   #58
Nebe
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
Nebe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: newpawht
Posts: 20,244
Haha! I bet they are a pain in the ass.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Nebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 11:35 AM   #59
spence
Registered User
iTrader: (0)
 
spence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: RI
Posts: 18,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rmarsh View Post
I work directly for the developer/ home builder....they refer customers to kitchen design/cabinet provider...then I install with very limited contact with customer....which is just how I like it to be honest...for me.... after 45 years of doing this.... customers are usually a PIA.
This is the problem I have with pro builders is when you don't get to hover over their shoulder. You see something you think isn't being done right, it's easy to google an expert YouTube video on how to do it on your iPad so you can just show them the right way. They're never very happy about it.

spence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2018, 12:31 PM   #60
Rmarsh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Freetown MA
Posts: 818
A customer recently told me he had spent 80 grand on his cabinets and appliances and told me my installation had to be perfect. I do good work but not perfect and i told him so. All I can do is my best.
I also told him it wasnt too late to get someone else.
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
Rmarsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2008, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Please use all necessary and proper safety precautions. STAY SAFE Striper Talk Forums
Copyright 1998-20012 Striped-Bass.com