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Old 01-24-2018, 09:16 AM   #61
Jim in CT
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And all of the 20 cities (except I think Indiapolis) are liberal. So which of the following 20 cities do you think are conservative? I've entered my guesses.

Austin, Tex. – liberal
Boston– liberal
Chicago– liberal
Columbus, Ohio – Voted 80% for Obama
Dallas – 2nd most liberal city in Texas after Austin
Denver– liberal
Indianapolis - conservative
Los Angeles– liberal
Miami – leans liberal
Montgomery County, Md. – liberal
Nashville– liberal
Newark– liberal
New York– liberal
Northern Virginia– liberal
Philadelphia– liberal
Pittsburgh– liberal
Raleigh, N.C. – liberal
Toronto– liberal
Washington– liberal
How many cities that are mid-size or larger, aren't left of center?

People from CT are not moving to the Nashville suburbs because they like the liberal politics of the city of Nashville. Nor are people from CT moving to the Charlotte suburbs because they like the liberal politics of the city of Charlotte. They are moving to the Nashville /Charlotte suburbs because it's a much better bargain than the CT suburbs. They want to be near the cities of Nashville/Charlotte, because regardless of politics, many people like to be near a city for the food, music, sports, etc...

You are bending over backwards in a desperate attempt to convince yourself that there is zero connection between Connecticut's brand of liberalism, and the fact that people are moving to the Carolinas and TN.

If people in CT want to live near a smallish city that's liberal, they would stay right where they are, Hartford is plenty liberal.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:40 AM   #62
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Wake Forest is an awesome school. Congratulations, you all did a lot of things right, for her to end up there.
Yeah, we stayed out of her way

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TDF, you know what I've heard about Charlotte? On the outskirts of the city are areas that look and feel like suburbs, but are technically still part of the city. I don't know why more cities don't do that, I would imagine a lot of people would like to live on a suburban type street but be very close to the downtown.
Yep, when my buddy moved down there about 5 years ago he moved into a neighborhood in Charlotte that had that feel. he paid $35k cash for a small 2 BR house w/ a small backyard. just perfect for him.

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I'm a huge fan of BBQ, looking forward to trying some in NC this summer.
Good place for BBQ in Greensboro, we ate there last visit. very reasonably priced too.

http://www.country-bbq.com/

"If you're arguing with an idiot, make sure he isn't doing the same thing."
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:46 AM   #63
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But you have constantly said here that the liberal cities suck or other vile terms. Now you're changing your arguement. It is tough to discuss something with someone who constantly changes their arguement.

I'm not the one bending over backwards - you are. You said 'liberal cities" earlier and discussed Charlotte (which is liberal). You brought up Amazon and used NC and TN as examples. But Amazon didn't say "NC" and "TN" - they specifically said the liberal cities in those states. They aren't looking to move to somewhere out in the country - they want the liberal cities. You defeated your own arguement.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:56 AM   #64
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But you have constantly said here that the liberal cities suck or other vile terms. Now you're changing your arguement. It is tough to discuss something with someone who constantly changes their arguement.

I'm not the one bending over backwards - you are. You said 'liberal cities" earlier and discussed Charlotte (which is liberal). You brought up Amazon and used NC and TN as examples. But Amazon didn't say "NC" and "TN" - they specifically said the liberal cities in those states. They aren't looking to move to somewhere out in the country - they want the liberal cities. You defeated your own arguement.
"But you have constantly said here that the liberal cities suck or other vile terms"

Liberalism has been an economic disaster for CT, unless you are in a public labor union, or unless you are wealthy. You may disagree. But I can make a very compelling case.

People are fleeing CT, and moving to right-leaning states because of the lower cost of living. You think that because there are left-leaning cities near where people are moving (though not liberal by CT standards), that means that liberalism isn't to blame for people leaving CT, nor is conservatism the reason that people are moving south.

Paul, I'll keep it simple. People are leaving CT because it's too expensive, and moving to places that are every bit as nice as CT, but much cheaper. That's not me bending over backwards, that's stating the obvious.

I say that CT's liberalism is to blame for the high cost here, and that southern conservatism gets credit for their ability to offer a similar quality of life at lower cost.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:58 AM   #65
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Jim, I have watched you clobber CT(for good reason) for years but you still live there. If there are so many more desirable cities and states in the country then why are you still in CT? What is preventing you from giving you and your family a better life? I remember when RIJimmy moved to Texas years ago from MA for that reason alone,I hope he is happy.
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Old 01-24-2018, 10:11 AM   #66
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Jim, I have watched you clobber CT(for good reason) for years but you still live there. If there are so many more desirable cities and states in the country then why are you still in CT? What is preventing you from giving you and your family a better life? I remember when RIJimmy moved to Texas years ago from MA for that reason alone,I hope he is happy.
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A fair question which I get a lot. My parents are 80 and not doing great physically, and live a mile away from me and my family. They see my kids at least 4-5 times a week, it's very healthy and beneficial for my kids and my parents. My wife is a stay-at-home mom, and spends a fair amount of time running errands with/for my parents. They'd be completely screwed if my family and I left. But I know exactly what it's costing me. I'll retire several years later than I would if I lived near Charlotte, which would by our choice. My retirement will be years shorter.
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Old 01-24-2018, 11:10 AM   #67
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My guess is that they would follow you. Good luck
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Old 01-24-2018, 11:21 AM   #68
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My guess is that they would follow you. Good luck
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If that were true we'd be there. I have 3 other brothers in CT, with 5 more grandchildren for them, they will never leave CT.

Every once in awhile I try to convince us all to leave. Never works.

I figure CT is going to be unable to pay its bills within 10 years, they will go through some kind of insolvency (no mechanism today for states to do it, from what I understand, maybe they'll create it for CT), and maybe come out better on the other side.

In 2017, our state almost imploded because our budget had no money for a $1 billion payment to pensions. In a few years, the promised payments are $3 billion a year. Today we can't afford $1 billion, and our population (and therefore tax revenue) is shrinking, and in a few years we're supposed to pay $3 billion a year, for many years in a row. Ain't gonna happen.

Our unfunded debt is now estimated at $100 billion. There are 3 million citizens (and dropping) which works out to $33,333 for every one of us, on top of current taxes. That is what "failure" looks like.
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Old 01-24-2018, 03:29 PM   #69
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And if you decide to join your brother:




By Lucas Peterson
Jan. 24, 2018

“Folsom Prison Blues,” the 1955 Johnny Cash classic, isn’t exactly a deep cut — anyone with even a passing familiarity with country music has heard it. So when the Don Kelley Band tore into the opening riff at the beginning of their set at Robert’s Western World — one of many honky-tonks on a brightly lit neon strip of Broadway in downtown Nashville — I nodded my head and tapped my feet along with the other hundred or so people in the joint. It was the musical equivalent of comfort food — nothing too surprising or challenging. I wasn’t quite ready for what happened next.

Luke McQueary, a skinny 17-year-old in a plaid Western-style shirt, stepped to the front of the stage and, instead of delivering the workmanlike guitar break I was expecting, set the stage aflame with a blistering solo I would have expected from someone twice his age and experience. It was no fluke — the virtuosity continued during the following song, performed with an earnest, almost Hendrix-like showmanship. I half expected someone to come out from the wings, wrap a robe around him, and help him off the stage, à la James Brown.

I was surprised, but I shouldn’t have been. A place nicknamed “Music City” has a reputation to uphold, and Nashville was more than ready to exceed my expectations. A mecca for talented musicians, Tennessee not only has more high-quality live music than you could ever hope to enjoy, but top-notch dining — both traditional Southern cooking and contemporary twists on old standards. It’s a great location for those on a budget, too — I scarcely noticed the damage to my wallet after a four-night trip there in November.

That area of Broadway is a little like the Las Vegas Strip or Bourbon Street: crowded and touristy, but fun in small doses. I visited there with my friend Halena Kays, with whom I crashed in nearby Murfreesboro, a suburb southeast of the city. We ended up at Robert’s Western World accidentally, as our plans to have dinner at nearby Merchants Restaurant, on the corner of Broadway and Fourth Avenue South, had hit a snag — the place was booked solid. No matter: We grabbed a $4 fried bologna sandwich (imagine a BLT — now imagine it twice as salty) and a couple of $4.25 Miller Lites at the honky-tonk while we listened to the aforementioned band.

Cramped and smoky, Santa's Pub is a favorite Nashville dive bar, with cold, cheap beer and live music.CreditJoe Buglewicz for The New York Times

I soon received a text that a table had opened up and we walked over to Merchant’s. The place effectively operates as two restaurants, a pricier steak and seafood restaurant on the second floor, and a less expensive, modern southern bistro on the ground floor. We opted for the latter and grabbed a booth in the bright, spacious dining room. The fried green tomatoes ($11) were spot-on, and the Nashville Caesar salad with cornbread croutons ($12), and a pulled pork sandwich ($13) were satisfying. One nice thing: When they saw we were sharing everything, they were happy to split the dishes into separate portions.

That strip of Broadway is just a stone’s throw from Ryman Auditorium, an indelible piece of Nashville history that belongs on every to-do list, especially if the Grand Ole Opry happens to be in residence. The Opry, an artistic home to country musicians since it began in 1925, takes place primarily at Opryland, about 25 minutes northeast of downtown. But if you can, see the show at the Ryman, home to the show from 1943-1974, which sometimes still hosts the Opry. The building itself is a relic — opened in 1892 as the Union Gospel Tabernacle, it earned the moniker “Mother Church of Country Music.” Near the back steps of its hallowed halls, Halena and I passed a young street performer with an amazing voice crooning a song I didn’t recognize. In Nashville, even the buskers have exceptional talent.

Tickets aren’t terribly cheap — the premium seats run close to $100 — but there’s a slight workaround. I picked up the cheapest tickets I could find: Two obstructed view seats for $48 apiece. (I also checked StubHub and other second-hand ticket sites; they weren’t helpful.) I was expecting to sit smack in front of a column — I wasn’t. The seats, on the main floor, right in the middle of the auditorium, were perfect. And while there was a thin pole in my line of sight, it didn’t bother me at all.

Onto the show — the Opry was one of the most pleasurable music performances I’ve attended in recent memory. After grabbing a $9 draft beer, we found our seats to the din of audience chatter and the buttery baritone of the evening’s announcer and M.C., Eddie Stubbs. The Opry functions simultaneously as a live radio show, broadcast on 650 AM WSM. If you’re familiar with public radio’s “Live from Here” (the show formerly known as “A Prairie Home Companion”), it functions in a similar way. Different acts come on and play just two or three songs — while that’s happening, the next act is hanging out in the wings, which gives the show a casual, collegial quality.


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Hot chicken with fried okra and french fries at Pepperfire.CreditJoe Buglewicz for The New York Times

An announcer’s podium is set up stage right, along with different producers and assistants working on their laptops — bands tune their instruments, guests chatter and banter with Mr. Stubbs, who also functions as an impeccable straight man, and the audience groans and chuckles while cheesy ad copy is read during the breaks. It’s a ton of fun. And then, of course, there’s the music.

“Connie Smith, ladies and gentlemen, the Rolls-Royce of country singers,” announced Mr. Stubbs, who then motioned for us to applaud. Traditional crooners like Ms. Smith were in the house, as was fresh-faced young man named William Michael Morgan, who played his debut single “I Met a Girl” (“He ain’t been off the teat long,” quipped Mike Snider, one of the other musicians).

Having discovered my inner country music fan, I stopped by the Country Music Hall of Fame ($25.95, but only $14 after 4 p.m; the museum closes at 5 p.m.) to continue my education. It’s easy to get lost in the overwhelming amount of history and information — but make sure you don’t miss, among other relics, Carl Perkins’s blue suede shoes (yes, those blue suede shoes), Elvis’s gold Cadillac (complete with refrigerator and swivel-mounted color TV) and some of Chet Atkins’s old guitars, including his first, a Sears Silverstone.

But there’s no substitution for live music. I made my way to the Bluebird Cafe, a popular, intimate venue that features local and established acts. Tickets are, well, extremely difficult to come by (it’s been showcased on the television show “Nashville”). They’re released weekly by the venue and space is tight, which means you have to be both lightning quick and lucky to nab a seat. If you’re in, you’re golden — tickets typically run in the $20 to $30 range. Cafe workers supposedly monitor Craigslist and ticket sites to crack down on scalping. If you’re not fortunate enough to snag online tickets (the likely case), you can wait in a queue that approaches the “Hamilton”-esque for one of 10 or so same-day tickets. I showed up at 7:30 one evening and the man at the door stifled a laugh. “Yeah, you’re not gonna make it in,” he said.

Down but not out, I headed over to Bransford Avenue to Santa’s Pub, a bar housed in a trailer that does live music on Sundays. After showing my ID to a man with a huge beard (was that Santa?), I headed inside, the top of my head almost brushing the ceiling of the double-wide. “No Cussin’, No Beer, No Cigarettes” read a sign on the back wall. Well, I counted all three. The place was cramped and smoky, like any respectable dive bar, and the beer was cold and cheap ($2 for a Pabst Blue Ribbon). The band, a five-piece outfit called Santa’s Ice Cold Pickers, was tight — their rendition of Ray Price’s “Crazy Arms” had me humming along.


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For those looking for a complete Southern meal, Arnold’s Country Kitchen offers the classic meat-and-three (main course and three side dishes).CreditJoe Buglewicz for The New York Times

Another highly enjoyable show I attended was at the Basement East, on the other side of the Cumberland River in East Nashville. The venue was decidedly less intimate than Santa’s or Bluebird, but I couldn’t complain about the program — a Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young tribute show, with proceeds benefiting Autism Speaks. For $10 (plus $2 service fee) I was treated to a Murderer’s Row of young, local talent. Highlights included Jesse Lynn Madera performing a lovely cover of “Don’t Let It Bring You Down” and Amber Woodhouse leading the excellent house band in a stirring rendition of “For What It’s Worth.”

While music is unquestionably the star of the Nashville scene, there are exceptional eats to enjoy between shows. Hot chicken, which has seen its star rise over the last decade, is one of the biggest attractions. I loved my crispy-skinned, exhilaratingly spicy leg quarter from Prince’s Hot Chicken ($5) which has no equal, in my opinion. But it also took an hour of waiting in line. It took no time to get my order at Pepperfire, another worthwhile hot chicken joint less than 10 minutes away from Prince’s. There, I dug into a Tender Royale, a spicy, deep-fried cheese sandwich topped with three chicken tenders ($12.49) with a strong, cumin-forward profile.

For those looking for a complete Southern meal, Arnold’s Country Kitchen is the place to find it. The classic meat-and-three (main course and three side dishes) runs just $10.74 for a huge tray full of food. I had a plate of thinly shaved roast beef with mac and cheese, tender greens and powerfully smoky pinto beans. Cafe Roze, a place with slightly healthier fare from New York-transplant Julia Jaksic, does a mean grain bowl called the Roze Bowl ($14) with beet tahini, black lentils and quinoa. And then there’s the happy hour at Chauhan Ale and Masala House, an Indian-Southern food fusion restaurant, where I got an order of lamb keema papadi nachos with a tamarind chutney ($6) that I still think about weeks after the fact.

But Nashville’s power to disarm and delight remains rooted in its music. When I attended the Opry, two guys who go by the handle LoCash strutted onto the stage in what came as the biggest surprise of the night. At first glance, LoCash seemed to epitomize the slick twang of everything I don’t particularly enjoy about modern country music — impeccably crafted facial hair, power chords and tacky clothes. Halena grabbed my arm, and I braced myself for awfulness.

Boy, was I wrong; these guys were fantastic performers. Within minutes, they had me and the rest of the audience eating out their hands — clapping and singing along to a song I’d never heard before. I don’t know if their exceedingly catchy “I Love This Life” will go down in the annals of country music’s great songs. But it was easily the most fun four minutes of the trip, and had me unironically singing the refrain the entire car ride home: I love a Friday night — man, I love this life.
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:38 PM   #70
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Nashville is awesome - I can relate to this article. Interesting mix of old and new music. Had a blast there.

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Old 01-25-2018, 08:55 AM   #71
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liberalism has zero to do why people are moving south and west ..

its about low housing costs and jobs namely Auto (non union) and gas and oil and baby boomers retirements moving south
why stay in MA making 15 bucks an hour when you can go to Tennessee make around the same and be able to afford your own place

Jobs in the NE have no longer manufacture based those commpanys screwed their employees in the 70s and 80's 90s and 2000s


Polaroid Corporation filed for federal bankruptcy protection on October 11, 2001

left executives of the company with large bonuses, while stockholders, as well as current and retired employees, were left with nothing.
lets not for get enron or the Subprime mortgage crisis but now we have a de regulation POTUS who will remove the regulation from the same industries . who created the need to impose the regulation in the 1st place???

Americans today are aware that corporate pensions have been virtually eliminated and that the few remaining private, as well as the nation’s public pensions, are in jeopardy. Even if you are among the lucky few that have a pension, you cannot rest assured that it will be there for all the years you’ll need it. Whether you know it or not, someone is busy trying to figure how to screw you out of your pension.

Americans also know the great 401k experiment of the past 30 years has been a disaster. It is now apparent that 401ks will not provide the retirement security promised to workers.

The signs of the coming retirement crisis are all around you. Who’s bagging your groceries: a young high school kid or an older “retiree” who had to go back to work to supplement his income or qualify for health insurance?

Faith in Companys and their big Tax break is unfounded and another nail in the coffin of the middle class

https://www.forbes.com/sites/edwards.../#b411c055b6fb

http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research...uth-west-again

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Old 01-25-2018, 09:11 AM   #72
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WD - good advice. Before anyone relocates they should definitely look into the state and local pension obligations they have. Many communities have been over generous with tax payer funded public pensions. Taxpayers are now on the hook and taxes will overburden these communities/states.

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Old 01-25-2018, 02:32 PM   #73
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liberalism has zero to do why people are moving south and west ..

its about low housing costs and jobs namely Auto (non union) and gas and oil and baby boomers retirements moving south
why stay in MA making 15 bucks an hour when you can go to Tennessee make around the same and be able to afford your own place

Pretty much what Jim has said. Are you saying that the taxes required for "liberal" programs are not at all part of the reason for a high cost of living?

Jobs in the NE have no longer manufacture based those commpanys screwed their employees in the 70s and 80's 90s and 2000s

Why on earth would manufacturers not want to be based in the NE? Oh . . . right . . . they want to screw their employees. So that's why people want to move where taxes are lower because they can find jobs there . . . and be employees who will be screwed by companies. Genius.

Polaroid Corporation filed for federal bankruptcy protection on October 11, 2001

left executives of the company with large bonuses, while stockholders, as well as current and retired employees, were left with nothing.

Polaroid was loved by its employees before the bankruptcy because it was one of the more employee friendly companies. It was avoiding a hostile takeover by a Disney co. at the time by buying back its stocks and transferring ownership of them to its employees (which it was considering before the takeover attempt). Polaroid simply could not, or did not know how to, stay relevant with the emergence of digital cameras. It borrowed a lot of money to buy back stocks and create the new partnership with its employees and was getting increasingly in debt because of losing sales and greater costs. Not sure what you would expect from it at this point. Good intentions went bad. Everyone who owned stock in the company, including corporate managers, lost their stock investment. The pensioned retirees had their pensions taken over by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp.

lets not for get enron or the Subprime mortgage crisis but now we have a de regulation POTUS who will remove the regulation from the same industries . who created the need to impose the regulation in the 1st place???

The Enron thing was not legit. It was a total sham, not an example of supposedly how evil our corporations are. The subprime mortgage crisis was a prime example of how government regulation can go bad. Banks backing shaky mortgages was a new policy which was made possible by a government regulation. Banks were far more scrupulous about making loans for mortgages before the invention of the Community Reinvestment Act. Getting rid of bad regulations, especially unconstitutional ones, is a good thing.

Americans today are aware that corporate pensions have been virtually eliminated and that the few remaining private, as well as the nation’s public pensions, are in jeopardy. Even if you are among the lucky few that have a pension, you cannot rest assured that it will be there for all the years you’ll need it. Whether you know it or not, someone is busy trying to figure how to screw you out of your pension.

The pension idea depends on a lot of things in order to be sustainable. It has to be adequately funded. Economic conditions have to remain stable. Payees have to remain viable which requires avoiding a permanent and rising debt. And requires a maintenance of the monetary employee/employer relationship.

Poor management will lead to unsustainability. Competition can disrupt adequate profitability.

Government policies greatly affect overall economic conditions. So pensions and savings and cost of living and doing business are all strongly influenced by taxation and regulation. Government overspending requiring excessive taxing and borrowing lead to reduced incomes and profit and to inflation which also lowers the value of savings and pensions. So excessive taxation used to fund government programs and pay debt, and ever changing and onerous regulations, all affect the viability of companies, including their ability to fund pensions. And it all affects the value of those pensions which decreases as government debt inflates prices. Government mandated bargaining can create an imbalance in company profits which lead to rising costs or loss of profits and so to underfunding pensions.

The ability to provide sustainable pensions for all the retirees in the private sector, who are living longer and longer, under the changing and more onerous government policies, simply became impossible. Large Corporations like the auto companies had as much or more retirees on the payroll than the number of actual working, productive, employees.

The public sector has the same problems. But since it bargains with itself, there is less incentive to stay within budgets. Public sector debt and its underfunded pensions is a huge problem which cannot be blamed on evil corporations.

Americans also know the great 401k experiment of the past 30 years has been a disaster. It is now apparent that 401ks will not provide the retirement security promised to workers.

The signs of the coming retirement crisis are all around you. Who’s bagging your groceries: a young high school kid or an older “retiree” who had to go back to work to supplement his income or qualify for health insurance?

Faith in Companys and their big Tax break is unfounded and another nail in the coffin of the middle class

https://www.forbes.com/sites/edwards.../#b411c055b6fb

http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research...uth-west-again
The nails in the coffin of the middle class could slowly be removed by freeing up the market. Lower taxes and proper deregulation can only help. Without that, the nails are already implanted. And the status quo is a vector in the direction of more nails.

Of course, we can just go full socialism. Then we will all be in the same class (except for the privileged government administrators). I don't think you could call that class the middle. Maybe just something like "the proletariat."

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Old 01-25-2018, 02:48 PM   #74
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liberalism has zero to do why people are moving south and west ..
You say people want to move to places that have a low cost of living and cheaper housing and better economic prospects. But you deny that has any connection to liberalism or conservatism.

Unless an individual wants to live near Manhattan or Boston so badly that they are willing to pay through the nose, then New England is a ripoff. Except for New Hampshire. But you see no political connection.

Enjoy your denial-fest.
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Old 01-25-2018, 04:24 PM   #75
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You say people want to move to places that have a low cost of living and cheaper housing and better economic prospects. But you deny that has any connection to liberalism or conservatism.

Unless an individual wants to live near Manhattan or Boston so badly that they are willing to pay through the nose, then New England is a ripoff. Except for New Hampshire. But you see no political connection.

Enjoy your denial-fest.
its called seeing the world with both eyes open

you use the word liberalism as a universal cause to everything

the past 63 years since 1952 40 of those years republicans held the white house

the other 23 years the Dems

whos in denial??? not I
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Old 01-25-2018, 04:41 PM   #76
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But you deny that has any connection to liberalism or conservatism.
liberalism or conservatism. isn't left behind when you move to another state .. thats in your imagination

What about the states that are experiencing an exodus? Here is that list in order:

New Jersey
New York
Illinois
Connecticut
Ohio
Kansas
Massachusetts
West Virginia
Mississippi
Maryland

these states are all “true blue.” people are leaving these states on the quest for economic prosperity.

not to find political nirvana
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Old 01-25-2018, 04:59 PM   #77
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its called seeing the world with both eyes open

you use the word liberalism as a universal cause to everything

the past 63 years since 1952 40 of those years republicans held the white house

the other 23 years the Dems

whos in denial??? not I
What does that have to do with the taxes and cost of living in the states?
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Old 01-25-2018, 05:44 PM   #78
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You say people want to move to places that have a low cost of living and cheaper housing and better economic prospects. But you deny that has any connection to liberalism or conservatism.

Unless an individual wants to live near Manhattan or Boston so badly that they are willing to pay through the nose, then New England is a ripoff. Except for New Hampshire. But you see no political connection.

Enjoy your denial-fest.
Has less to do with politics and more just about macro trends.
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:10 PM   #79
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Has less to do with politics and more just about macro macaroni trends.
Fixed
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:14 PM   #80
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Fixed
Is that on the menu?
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Old 01-25-2018, 07:11 PM   #81
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Is that on the menu?
Simply pick whatever fancy, trendy word you wish to portray what it is "more just about," stick it in your political hat, and call it macaroni.
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:12 AM   #82
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Zing🎯
Posted from my iPhone/Mobile device
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:08 AM   #83
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its called seeing the world with both eyes open

you use the word liberalism as a universal cause to everything

the past 63 years since 1952 40 of those years republicans held the white house

the other 23 years the Dems

whos in denial??? not I
"you use the word liberalism as a universal cause to everything"

Not remotely true. I agree with liberals on gay marriage and the death penalty. I'm no thoughtless zombie. But in terms of economics, liberalism has almost a 100% failure rate in this country. I don't say that because I happen to like it. I say it, because it's true.


"the past 63 years since 1952 40 of those years republicans held the white house

the other 23 years the Dems "

Many things wrong with that statement. First, "republican" doesn't always mean "conservative". Hell, Bill Clinton was a Democrats who implemented VERY conservative economic principles, and it worked spectacularly well. also, the legislature is where the action is, they write laws and craft budgets. Not the executive. Not usually, anyway...executive orders are changing that a bit.

"whos in denial??? "

You.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:00 PM   #84
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"you use the word liberalism as a universal cause to everything"

Not remotely true. I agree with liberals on gay marriage and the death penalty. I'm no thoughtless zombie. But in terms of economics, liberalism has almost a 100% failure rate in this country. I don't say that because I happen to like it. I say it, because it's true.


"the past 63 years since 1952 40 of those years republicans held the white house

the other 23 years the Dems "

Many things wrong with that statement. First, "republican" doesn't always mean "conservative". Hell, Bill Clinton was a Democrats who implemented VERY conservative economic principles, and it worked spectacularly well. also, the legislature is where the action is, they write laws and craft budgets. Not the executive. Not usually, anyway...executive orders are changing that a bit.

"whos in denial??? "

You.

"republican" doesn't always mean "conservative". Wow thats your defense ... the Rino argument your to funny
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Old 01-26-2018, 02:20 PM   #85
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FedEx announced wage increases, employee bonuses and pension funding on Friday, citing the new Republican-backed tax-reform plan.

The company announced that two-thirds of $200 million in increased compensation will go to hourly employees, while the remainder will be put toward performance-based incentive plans for salaried employees.

FedEx also said $1.5 billion will be put toward the company's pension plan and another $1.5 billion would go toward expanding the company's hub in Indianapolis.


"FedEx believes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will likely increase [gross domestic product] and investment in the United States," the company said on its website.



Home Depot said on Thursday it would be giving a $1,000 bonus to employees who have worked at Home Depot at least 20 years, according to CNBC.

Starbucks announced new raises for its employees on Wednesday, while JPMorgan Chase and Disney said on Tuesday they would give their employees raises and bonuses as a result of tax reform.

http://thehill.com/policy/finance/37...mid-tax-reform
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Old 01-26-2018, 02:54 PM   #86
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"republican" doesn't always mean "conservative". Wow thats your defense ... the Rino argument your to funny
it's not my defense, it's fact. In terms of economic policy, Bill Clinton was conservative.

Truth is, I'm not funny, I am hysterical. But this is still fact.
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Old 01-26-2018, 02:55 PM   #87
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FedEx announced wage increases, employee bonuses and pension funding on Friday, citing the new Republican-backed tax-reform plan.

The company announced that two-thirds of $200 million in increased compensation will go to hourly employees, while the remainder will be put toward performance-based incentive plans for salaried employees.

FedEx also said $1.5 billion will be put toward the company's pension plan and another $1.5 billion would go toward expanding the company's hub in Indianapolis.


"FedEx believes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will likely increase [gross domestic product] and investment in the United States," the company said on its website.



Home Depot said on Thursday it would be giving a $1,000 bonus to employees who have worked at Home Depot at least 20 years, according to CNBC.

Starbucks announced new raises for its employees on Wednesday, while JPMorgan Chase and Disney said on Tuesday they would give their employees raises and bonuses as a result of tax reform.

http://thehill.com/policy/finance/37...mid-tax-reform
Oh stop it, everyone knows this is only helping the super rich.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:00 PM   #88
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FedEx announced wage increases, employee bonuses and pension funding on Friday, citing the new Republican-backed tax-reform plan.

The company announced that two-thirds of $200 million in increased compensation will go to hourly employees, while the remainder will be put toward performance-based incentive plans for salaried employees.

FedEx also said $1.5 billion will be put toward the company's pension plan and another $1.5 billion would go toward expanding the company's hub in Indianapolis.


"FedEx believes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will likely increase [gross domestic product] and investment in the United States," the company said on its website.



Home Depot said on Thursday it would be giving a $1,000 bonus to employees who have worked at Home Depot at least 20 years, according to CNBC.

Starbucks announced new raises for its employees on Wednesday, while JPMorgan Chase and Disney said on Tuesday they would give their employees raises and bonuses as a result of tax reform.

http://thehill.com/policy/finance/37...mid-tax-reform
Its a 1 time dog and pony show .. a pr stunt to look as if they are giving back , and not funneling all the money back to share holder's and to praise dear leader .... was in Walmart today only 4 check out lines open ... looks like they toldeveryone they increased the pay but failed to say they cut the hours
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:17 PM   #89
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Its a 1 time dog and pony show .. a pr stunt to look as if they are giving back , and not funneling all the money back to share holder's and to praise dear leader .... was in Walmart today only 4 check out lines open ... looks like they toldeveryone they increased the pay but failed to say they cut the hours
"Its a 1 time dog and pony show "

Apple announced 20,000 new jobs, and a tax payment of $38 billion. Comcast (who own MSNBC) announced $50 billion in infrastructure spending. dog and pony show?

Obama didn't do anything to do more for these folks in 8 years.

"and not funneling all the money back to share holder's" Also good for the economy.

"and to praise dear leader "

Again, Comcast, who signs Rachael Maddow's paycheck, is spending $50 billion to make Trump look good. This is what you are saying?
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Old 01-27-2018, 06:16 AM   #90
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Reuters JANUARY 22, 2018 / 9:17 AM / 5 DAYS AGO

IMF raises global growth forecast, sees Trump tax boost

Noah Barkin, Dmitry Zhdannikov

DAVOS, Switzerland (Reuters) - The International Monetary Fund on Monday revised up its forecast for world economic growth in 2018 and 2019, saying sweeping U.S. tax cuts were likely to boost investment in the world’s largest economy and help its main trading partners.
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